Magazine Front Cover

Below is the final version of my film magazine front cover:

Please click on any of the images below if you would like to take a closer look!

Below is a very rough draft of my film magazine:

This is a rough draft of my magazine cover

Deconstructions:

Before completing a magazine front cover including our film as the main topic, I deconstructed six real film magazine front covers of the same genre in order to identify any conventions of a film magazine front cover that I should include on my own cover. These deconstructions are shown below:

Empire Film Magazine:

Empire 1

Empire 2

Empire 3

Empire Film Magazine Comparison

All three of the Empire Film magazine front covers I looked at had some consistencies. The title is always located in the same place on the front cover; in the centre at the top of the page. Their Empire logo is usually red however, in some special editions or other editions where the colour scheme does not match red, the colour changes. For example the April 2007 edition I analysed had ‘Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer’ as its feature film. The Empire logo was altered to silver to create a better effect for its limited edition cover.

The masthead contains certain features that are uniform for every issue; the price, date of issue, web address and slogan. The price and date of issue are always placed above the ‘M’ of the logo, and the web address just below the ‘E’ of the logo. Their slogan, ‘THE WORLD’S BEST MOVIE MAGAZINE’ is always placed below the logo. This attracts the audience because it is a unique selling point, this is the best movie magazine to buy, and therefore, movie lovers should buy this magazine, instead of others. The barcode though, is placed on each issue where it is appropriate or convenient, in order not to cover the feature film image or other text. This does not particularly affect consumers as they don’t have a use for the barcode.

All three of the Empire magazine covers include details of other articles that are featured in the issue. This attracts the audience as it gives them a ‘sneak peek’ of what they will find in the magazine, and also entices them into buying it, especially if they are particularly interested in one or all of the articles that are mentioned.

The feature film of each issue is prioritised by the image on the cover, any text or other images surround the feature film and are usually either flush right or flush left. It is also shown as being priority by the way that the image of the feature film interrupts the magazine title/logo. This suggests that the magazines are for subscribers or regular consumers of the magazine, as they don’t need to be able to read the title to know what it says or which magazine it is. The three issues I looked at seem to be aimed at a male audience, with either dark, adventurous tones or a seductive image that encourages the ‘male gaze’.  The subject of the image is looking directly at the camera lens on all three covers, instantly creating a relationship with the reader.

The language used on the three covers is informal and conversational. It is not intimidating, instead it is friendly, and it invites readers in, for example “And have lunch with… Transformers 2’s Megan Fox”, the readers won’t literally be having lunch with Megan Fox. It is a simplistic and friendly way of including them in the interview, making them feel involved. In some cases the language is abbreviated, making it only understandable to fans of a particular movie, for example, on the ‘Transformers 2” issue; there is a banner over the top right-hand corner which says “TRON REBOOTED!”, this is an abbreviation of a character’s name in the film, “Megatron”. Only fans of the prequel to “Transformers 2”, or people who are familiar with the first instalment, would know that this is who the comment is referring to.

I find that all three of the Empire magazine covers I looked at appeal to a primary audience; people that are subscribers to the magazine or people who are interested in films that will buy the magazine, as opposed to secondary readers; readers who obtain the magazine second hand. I think this because the issues are very conversational and inviting, like they are familiar with their readers and have regular “discussions”.

Total Film Magazine:

Total Film 1

Total Film 2

Total Film 3

Total Film Magazine Comparison

All three of the Total Film magazine covers I looked at had particular consistencies, the main factor being masthead of the magazine. The title is always located in the same place; at the top of the page in the centre. There is a slight gap between the top edge of the page and the title, where editors place titles or images of other film previews or a banner of text. Also included in the masthead is the date of issue, the price and the web address of the magazine, placed above the “M” of the logo. The ‘Total Film’ logo is usually white; however, this changes with particular issues, in order to in keep with the overall theme of the issue. For example, August 2010 issue with “Salt” as its feature film has a ‘smashed’ logo that are the same colours as the background of the main image; oranges and yellows. This relates to the film “Salt” as it is an action/adventure film. The barcode is also consistent on every issue and is located in the bottom right-hand corner of the page.

All three of the Total Film magazine covers include details of other articles that are featured in the issue. This attracts the audience as it gives them a ‘sneak peek’ of what they will find in the magazine, and also entices them into buying it, especially if they are particularly interested in one or all of the articles that are mentioned.

The feature film of each issue is prioritised by the image on the cover, any text or other images surround the image advertising the feature film and are usually either flush right or flush left. It is also shown as being priority by the way that the image of the feature film interrupts the magazine title/logo. This suggests that the magazines are for subscribers or regular consumers of the magazine, as they don’t need to be able to read the title to know what it says or which magazine it is. The three issues I looked don’t all seem to be aimed at a male or female audience. For example the November 2009 issue has the image of Megan Fox dressed in character for her role in the film “Jennifer’s Body”, she is dressed in a cheerleading outfit and although she is not posing provocatively the image still encourages the ‘male gaze’, as she is wearing a mini-skirt and bearing her mid-rift. This is obviously aimed at a male audience. This is different to the August 2010 issue with Angelina Jolie as “Salt” on the front cover though, as she is not dressed or posing provocatively, instead she is dressed all in black, and her clothes are far from revealing. However, as she is an attractive, famous actress, the cover could still be perceived as sexy. But I think it can be admired by both males and females. Contrast to both of these, the January 2010 issue has “Avatar” as its feature film, and the front cover is therefore more of a sci-fi, fantasy, ‘futuresque’ theme, aimed at both males and females that are simply interested in “Avatar”.  The subject of the image is looking directly at the camera lens on two of the covers, instantly creating a relationship with the reader.

The language used on the three covers is informal and conversational. It is not intimidating, instead it is friendly, and it invites readers in, for example “It’s a guy thing” and “SHAKEN AND STIRRED”.

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